Fear & Loathing in Service Station Britain by Ross Domoney

From summer 2017: 

Amongst the darkness of the recent attacks and days before another election, we asked the British people:

What do they see threatening them and their Britishness.

Instead of heading to the squares of towns and cities where people congregate, we were drawn to the more unusual places within the British landscape.

Places that were once the height of fashion and destination diner spots. But we now know them more as creepy, neglected road side refuge areas.

The great British service station.

By Ross Domoney & Keymea Yazdanian

Uprooted wins best factual at prestigious Royal Television Society Awards by Ross Domoney

Miss Daily looks on at her tangerine tree as diggers knocking down the old Myatt's Field North estate inch closer to it. In 'Uprooted' the tree becomes a symbol of resistance as many residents are sad to loose old memories as their homes are bulldozed. 

Miss Daily looks on at her tangerine tree as diggers knocking down the old Myatt's Field North estate inch closer to it. In 'Uprooted' the tree becomes a symbol of resistance as many residents are sad to loose old memories as their homes are bulldozed. 

We are pleased to announce that the Grierson shortlisted 'Uprooted' has won the Royal Television Society best factual award. 

 “A beautifully crafted film that demonstrated a real understanding of how personal stories, powerfully told, can be used to shine a light on a wider political issue.”

A humbling thank you to the residents of Myatt's Field North who intimately shared their struggle with us. 

Thanks to the pre and post production crew who made this film possible. 

 

 

From the archive: Platanos - Self-Rescue by Ross Domoney

From the archive: A short clip from a documentary we were never able to finish in early 2016. It shows the hardships of volunteers who run a self orginized refugee rescue camp (Platanos) on the Greek island of Lesvos. A group of friends from Athens set up the camp in the face of E.U inaction with regards to the refugee crisis on the island of Lesvos.

This film is released under the Creative Commons BY-NC-ND licence.
Details here: creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.en_GB

Uprooted nominated for an RTS student TV award! by Ross Domoney

Really pleased to announce that our Grierson shortlisted documentary 'Uprooted' has been nominated for a Royal Television Society award. Well done to all the team that made this moving documentary happen. 

https://rts.org.uk/studentawards2017

Social cleansing continues across London and England as estates are 're-developed' for profit displacing communities along the way. 

See the trailer bellow: 

If you want to learn more about the housing crisis here in London you can also watch 'Estate of War' by lyrical bad man Potent Whisper. We shot this a few months back. 

Video: The Real State of Emergency by Ross Domoney

As the press and politicians obsess themselves with the second round of voting in the French elections, with the choice between the two final contenders seeming meaningless for many, we follow those who were never offered a choice to begin with: France's forgotten refugee populations are now faced with grim future scenarios, dictated by either the neoliberal, or the outright fascist policies of the two remaining candidates. 

Video from first round of French elections by Ross Domoney

In the hours before the first round of the French elections, as the voices of European reason and liberalism anguished and then sighed with relief, we took to the streets of Paris: from its edge to its core, the French capital exudes fear and resentment. For so many, the election is distant, irrelevant, unable to change a life for which there is little to celebrate.

By Ross & Antonis

Saint-Denis, the day before. by Ross Domoney

'As France braces itself for the April 22 election, we visit the Parisian suburb of Saint-Denis to talk with the locals there: to get a sense of their fears and hopes for what lies ahead.'

Glare at your TV screen, flick through your feeds, blink at your flashing updates and you will soon immerse yourself in what is meant to be an election like no other, an election that is supposed to determine the future of France and even Europe as we’ve known it so far.

Keep it at that, and you could easily believe the election is fought at the TV studios, between the four gladiators fighting for the soul of the Republic. But out in the city things are, as always, more complicated. In the days leading up to, and following the election, we ask urbanites about their fears and their hopes. As the country grips itself for the mother of all battles, we delve into the city’s streets and its metro carriages to brush out its psyche.

Ross Domoney & Antonis Vradis. 

With the help of Daniel Murphy & Eric Amalraj  

Some of my footage will be in 'Why It's Kicking Off Everywhere' by Ross Domoney

Pleased to announce I have got some of my cinematic footage of political unrest from Washington DC to Athens in Paul Mason's new play which will be performed at the Young Vic this week and broadcast on BBC. 

The play is based on Paul's book 'Why it's kicking off everywhere'.

"The world premiere of a play about revolution.

This is the story of the networked generation. How did we get from the optimism of the Arab Spring and the Occupy Movement to Trump’s election and the dislocation of the present day?

Journalist Paul Mason teams up with Young Vic artistic director David Lan for this powerful and challenging new show based on Paul’s acclaimed book.

Performed by Paul Mason, Khalid Abdalla, Lara Sawalha and Sirine Saba in promenade with stunning video designs, the audience will interact with the company throughout the show.

The show will be filmed and broadcast at a later date by BBC Television as part of Performance Live."

http://www.youngvic.org/whats-on/kicking-off-live

New Arrivals: They left Afghanistan a family of nine. They arrived in the UK a family of two by Ross Domoney

New Arrivals

The first episode of a series I filmed, directed and edited for the Guardian as part a project launched simultaneously with Der Spiegel, Le Monde and El País. The project looks at how refugees and asylum seekers are getting on in Europe and how the continents various governments are treating them. 

Click here to view the video. 

'More than 1.2 million people sought asylum in Europe last year. How are they adapting to their new lives? What do they miss? What’s it like to swap Homs for Hamburg, Kabul for Croydon, or Mosul for the Mosel? Which European countries are best at helping refugees settle? In this series, the Guardian teams up with Der Spiegel, Le Monde and El País to get inside newly arrived communities in western Europe to assess whether promises are being kept, whether European society is changing the new arrivals – and vice versa.'

  • This project is funded by the European Journalism Centre via a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation